The Baptism by the Holy Spirit

1 Corinthians

The Baptism by the Holy Spirit

January 30th, 1966 @ 8:15 AM

1 Corinthians 12:13

For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit.
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THE BAPTISM OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

Dr. W. A. Criswell

Acts 1:5

1-30-66    8:15 a.m.

 

On the radio you are sharing the services of the First Baptist Church in Dallas.  This is the pastor bringing the message entitled The Baptism of the Holy Spirit.  This is a sermon and a series of sermons that I had proposed to deliver a year and a half ago, almost a year and a half ago, fall of last year.  These sermons are going to be published in a book.  It will be a companion book to the series that I preached on the Bible.

Zondervan Publishing Company published those sermons on the Bible under the title The Bible for Today’s World.  And these sermons on the Holy Spirit are going to be published under the title The Holy Spirit in Today’s World.  When he came down here a few days ago, he showed me a large publication; and in that publication there is a full page ad announcing that this spring this book, The Holy Spirit in Today’s World, would be available, this spring.

I have not even prepared the sermons yet, and yet the announcement is already scattered all over this world that the book will be available this spring, in March.  It was my proposal to deliver these sermons, this one, I have delivered some of them, several of them, but this sermon on the Holy Spirit and those that follow after—there are about, oh, six or seven of them—they were supposed to be delivered a year and a half ago.  But I couldn’t do it.  And the weeks passed, and they grew into months, and the months into a year and a half.

I never stumbled before such a mountain in my life.  I never wrestled with any subject in my life.  Nor all the subjects that I have studied put together have I ever been so perplexed and so lost as I tried to think through, and study through, and think and pray through, and meditate through this subject of the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  Now at long last I am ready to speak.  And may God bless the messages.

I have one great sorrow in it and that is you will hear just a part of it today.  I wish you could see all of it because it is like looking at a great painting and you just see a little section of it.  But I cannot present it all.  There is not time.  I doubt whether I shall have time even to present the segment that I have prepared for this morning’s hour.  But we begin, and it will be followed next Sunday, and then these immediate Sundays, I pray I shall have opportunity to complete the series, The Baptism of the Holy Spirit.

There are five things to be said about it to begin with that are astonishing, that are amazing.  They are things that you would never dream of or guess for, and certainly I did not realize them until I began this study.  First of all: there is no such thing as that in the Bible, the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  The phrase is not used.  The nomenclature is not referred to.  There is no such thing in the Bible as the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  It is so greatly used, the term is, it is so vastly abused, but it isn’t found in the Word of God.  There is no such thing in the Word of God as the baptism of the Holy Spirit.

All right, a second thing:  to my amazement and to my vast and illimitable astonishment, there is no reference to it in the Gospels.  There is no reference to it in the Book of Acts, except in the prophecy of John the Baptist [Acts 1:5].  It isn’t referred to.  It isn’t mentioned.  It is not discussed.  It is not said.  There is no thing of any reference at all in the Gospels except the prophecy of it by John the Baptist [Matthew 3:11]; nor is it found in the Book of Acts, just the prophecy of it by John the Baptist [Acts 1:5]—which I say is an astonishing thing to me.

John the Baptist said, in Matthew 3:11, “I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance:  but He that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear:  He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire.”  And I would have supposed after a prophecy like that, that page after page after page I would be told about Jesus baptizing by the Holy Spirit, with the Holy Spirit.  It is never referred to.  It is never mentioned and the same thing in the Book of Acts.

The Acts starts off with that same Johanine prophecy:  “For John,” Acts 1:5, “For John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence.”  And I would think page after page after page in the Book of Acts you would find the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  It is never referred to.  It is never mentioned.

All right, a third thing that is astonishing to me as I began the study: when I read of the marvelous outpouring of the Spirit in Pentecost in Jerusalem [Acts 2:1-4, 16-35], and then at Samaria [Acts 8:15-17], and then at Caesarea [Acts 10:44-47], and then at Ephesus [Acts 19:1-6], I would have thought I would have read page after page of the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  It is not mentioned.  It is not referred to.  The word is not used.

All right, another astonishing thing as I began this study: nowhere in the Bible, nowhere—it is alien to the mind of God and it is alien to the Holy Scriptures—nowhere is there any commandment, or mandate, or plea, or exhortation to seek the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  It is not in the Bible nor is it even approached.  There is nothing of exhortation, or appeal, or commandment to seek the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  And yet all over this world, all over this world there are people, and there are groups, and there are churches who are gathered together and they are praying for this unique blessing that they call “the baptism of the Holy Spirit”; and they are asking it of God.  They believe that there is something special that God has for an elect few, and so they gather and pray for, and ask for, and beg for, and plead for, the baptism of the Holy Spirit.  And yet there is not one syllable in all of the Word of God that even approaches a commandment or a suggestion that we do such a thing.  And not only that, but there is a whole system of theology, and there are whole vast denominational groups who believe in a “second work of grace.”  First we are regenerated, we are saved, and second we are sanctified and baptized by the Holy Spirit.  And a whole system of theology and a whole vast doctrinal presentation of the grace of the Son of God is presented in that format.  But there is no approach to it in the Bible.  There is no suggestion of it in the Bible.  It does not exist in the Word of God.

Now a fifth and a last thing of astonishment: as I have said, there is no mention of the baptism by the Holy Spirit in the Gospels, in the whole story of the life of Christ, except the prophecy of John that it would come to pass [Matthew 3:11].  There is no mention of the baptism of the Holy Spirit in the Book of Acts except the prophecy of John that it would come to pass [Acts 1:5].  Now this is not an oversight on the part of the sovereign and infinite omniscience of God.  This is a studied purpose in the plan and election of Almighty God.  And what the Lord did was this: it is not presented, the doctrine of it, the teaching of it, the meaning of it is not presented in the Gospels, and it is not presented in the Book of Acts, but the doctrinal teaching of the meaning of the baptism with or by the Holy Spirit was reserved for the Epistles.  And it is only in the Epistles that you will find the meaning and the doctrine of the baptism by the Holy Spirit.

Now, immediately this raises a multitude of questions in your mind, in my mind.  Well then, what is the baptism by the Holy Spirit?  And when does it happen?  And where did it happen?  And who is the baptizer?  And into what does He baptize?  And are there any signs of it?  And what are the results of it?  Well, I just decided this morning we would plunge right into the middle of the doctrine, or as some might say, “the controversy,” and then work out from both sides and to both ends.  So we shall start in the very middle of it.

Who is the baptizer?  And into what does He baptize?  When the Bible uses the prophecy and the expression of John, “Ye shall be baptized, en pneumati hagiō,” e-n, the Greek preposition e-n, en pneumati hagiō, and when the Epistles say, 1 Corinthians 12:13, “For by one Spirit, en pneumati,” same phrase, “For by one Spirit are ye all baptized into one body,” who is this baptizer?  Who does the baptizing?  And into what are we baptized?  Now, from the prophecy of John it is very plain, very plain, that Jesus is the baptizer; He is the baptizer.  “I indeed baptize you with water; but there cometh One after me who is mightier than I:  and He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire” [Matthew 3:11].  Jesus here is the baptizer, very plain.  “I baptize you with water; but there is One coming after me mightier than I,” referring to the Messiah, “and He shall baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”  Jesus is the baptizer.

Now in the Epistles, 1 Corinthians 12:13, “For by one Spirit are ye all baptized into one body.”  Here the Holy Spirit is the baptizer.  “For by one Spirit, for in one Spirit, for by one Spirit are ye all baptized into one body.”  In the prophecy of John [Matthew 3:11], Jesus is the baptizer.  In 1 Corinthians 12:13, the Holy Spirit is the baptizer; and that baptizer, the Holy Spirit, baptizes us into the body of Christ.

Well, there must be two baptisms, then.  There must be a baptism by Jesus, in the Holy Spirit.  The sphere is the Holy Spirit.  There must be a baptism by Jesus, and we’re baptized into the Holy Spirit.  Then there must be another baptism.  There must be a baptism by the Holy Spirit Himself into the body of Christ, joining believers to the church, joining believers to the body of our Lord.  There must be two baptisms.

Well, that might be all right, and of course there are many, many, all of these of a certain group believe that there are two different baptizers, and two baptisms.  That might be all right except for one thing, and that is this.  The same Greek expression is used in both instances, both times, en pneumati.  And to build two different systems of theology on the same Greek expression, to build two different systems of theology on the same Greek preposition is a precarious thing to begin with.

Now, there are those who believe that that Greek preposition en is used in the locative case in Acts 1:5, “For John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized en pneumate, in the Holy Spirit, not many days hence.”  So they say that Greek proposition, e-n, here is locative, “We are baptized in the Holy Spirit” [Acts 1:5].  Then they say that in 1 Corinthians 12:13, that Greek preposition ­e-n is instrumental: “For by one Spirit, for en pneumate, are you all baptized into one body.”  So they say it is a locative situation here, “We are baptized in the Holy Spirit” [Acts 1:5], but in the twelfth chapter of 1 Corinthians, the thirteenth verse, it’s instrumental: “by the Holy Spirit” [1 Corinthians 12:13].  So they translate the same Greek preposition in two different ways, and build two different systems of doctrine upon it.

Now to begin with, I say that’s a very precarious thing.  Now that Greek proposition is plainly instrumental in 1 Corinthians 12:13: “For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body.”  It is plainly instrumental there.  “By the Spirit, by the Holy Spirit of God are we all baptized into the body of our Lord.”  Now as I study it, I think it is always instrumental.  It is the Holy Spirit who does the baptizing, always, always, without exception.  The Holy Spirit is the instrument, the agent, the baptizer [1 Corinthians 12:13].  “Well then, preacher, what are you going to do with Matthew 3:11, where it is plainly prophesied by John that Jesus is the baptizer?  ‘I indeed baptize you with water; but there cometh One after me, mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear:  He shall baptize you, en pneumati’ [Matthew 3:11].  Jesus is plainly the baptizer there, and yet you have just said that without exception the Holy Spirit is always the baptizer and not Jesus [1 Corinthians 12:13].  All right now, how do you come to that conclusion?”  Well, I will show you how.  God help me, I will tell you how.  God be good to me and help me, I will explain you how.

Now let’s begin.  In that prophecy of the coming of the Holy Spirit and the baptizing by the Holy Spirit, as I have said, there is not a mention of it.  There is not a reference to it in the life of our Lord.  Page after page you will never hear it mentioned, and you will never hear it referred to.  There must be some reason for it.  There has to be some reason for it, for this is one of the greatest of all of the doctrines and revelations and presences of God.  There must be a reason for it.

Well, the reason is very plain and very simple.  The outpouring of the Spirit, the baptism by the Spirit, is a post day-of-His-flesh gift.  It is an ascension gift [Acts 1:4-5].  It is not something that comes to pass or that came to pass in the life of our Lord in the days of His flesh.  It is a gift after Jesus was glorified, not in the days of His flesh.

For example, in the seventh chapter of the Gospel of John, when the Lord speaks of our having rivers of water flowing out of us who believe in Him, then John parenthesizes and he says, “But this spake the Lord of the Spirit, whom they that believe on Him should receive, should receive, shall receive: for the Holy Ghost was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified” [John 7:38-39].

The Holy Spirit is an ascension gift of our blessed Lord after His death [Matthew 27:32-50], after His burial [Matthew 27:57-60], after His resurrection [Matthew 28:1-7], after His ascension into glory [Acts 1:9]; and when the Lord asks for the gift from the Father in heaven [John 14:16].  And according to the promise made to Jesus in heaven, it is then, when the Lord is at the right hand of God [Hebrews 10:12], that the Holy Spirit was sent down as an ascension gift [Acts 2:1-4].

Baptism is always death, burial, and resurrection [Romans 6:3-5].  It is never anything else.  Baptism, wherever that word “baptism” is used, it has always in the Scriptures that one reference: baptism is death, burial, and resurrection.  It is that in symbolic form.  It is that in water baptism.  We are buried with our Lord in the likeness of His death, and we are raised with our Lord in the likeness of His resurrection [Romans 6:5].

Water baptism [Romans 6:3-5] is a symbol and a sign of the reality which is Spirit baptism [1 Corinthians 12:13], which also is death, burial, and resurrection.  By the Spirit of God we are buried with our Lord and dead to the world, and we are raised with our Lord and made alive in Christ [1 Corinthians 12:13].  That’s what the Spirit baptism is.  It is death, burial, and resurrection.  We are crucified with our Lord, and raised with our Lord, and we are now in Christ [1 Corinthians 12:13].  “Know ye not,” said Paul in the epistle to the Romans, chapter 6:

that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into His death?

Therefore we are buried with Him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

For if we have been planted together in the likeness of His death, we shall be also in the likeness of His resurrection.

[Romans 6:3-5]

And again, in the glorious passage in [Colossians chapter] 2: “Buried with Him in baptism, wherein also we are raised with Him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised Him from the dead” [Colossians 2:12].  There could not be any baptism of the Holy Spirit in the days of the flesh of our Lord because the baptism of the Holy Spirit is death, burial, and resurrection! [Colossians 2:12].  And that operation of the Holy Spirit could not be, because the Holy Spirit in that divine operation was not given until the Lord was glorified [John 7:39], up there at the right hand of the Father [Hebrews 1:3].  And that is why there is no mention of the baptism in the days of our Lord.  It is never referred to.  There was no such a thing until the ascension of our Lord in glory [Acts 1:9].

Now the coming of the Holy Spirit is an ascension gift from heaven.  It’s an ascension from the hands of our Lord.  As Paul wrote, “He led captivity captive, He ascended up on high, and He gave gifts unto men” [Ephesians 4:8].  When the Lord ascended from His resurrection glory into heaven [Matthew 28:5-6; Acts 1:9], and at the right hand of God [Hebrews 1:3], then He bestowed this marvelous gift of the Father, which is the outpouring of the Holy Spirit of God [John 14:16].

And had there been no death [Matthew 27:32-50], and had there been no resurrection [Matthew 28:5-7], and had there been no ascension [Acts 1:9], there would have been no Holy Spirit, no outpouring of the heavenly gift [Matthew 3:1].  This is something Christ did for us.  “It is expedient for you,” He said, “that I go away; for if I go not away, He will not come, the Paraclete, the Holy Spirit; but if I go away: I will send Him unto you” [John 16:7].

And the Lord ascended into heaven, and there at the right hand of God [Hebrews 1:3], He poured out this gift upon the world, upon His believers [Acts 2:16-17].  Now, that is the sense, that is the sense in which Jesus is the baptizer.  That is the fulfillment of the prophecy of John in Matthew 3:11: “I baptize you with water; but He that cometh after me, the Lord, mightier than I: He shall baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”  In that sense and in that sense alone, Jesus is the baptizer.  Jesus is the baptizer in the sense that He sent as an ascension gift the Holy Spirit, and poured it out into this world [John 16:7].  He is the primary mover.

It is from His gracious hands that the gift comes upon us and into this world [John 16:7].  But having come, and the Holy Spirit having been poured out, according to the Epistles, it is the Holy Spirit now who is the immediate agent [1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 4:5].  Jesus is the primary agent in the sense, and in this sense only, that He poured out the Holy Spirit as an ascension gift when He returned to the Father [Acts 2:1-4].  But when the Holy Spirit actually came down into this world [Acts 2:1-4], the immediate agent, the baptizer now is the Holy Spirit of God [1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 4:5].

He represents Jesus.  He is Jesus in our hearts, and in our churches, and in our midst, and it is the Holy Spirit that now baptizes, “For by, for en pneumate for by one Spirit are we all baptized into the body of Christ” [1 Corinthians 12:13].  So the baptizer is, in our life and in our experience, and in our churches, and in this day of grace, the Holy Spirit.  He baptizes into the body of Christ [1 Corinthians 12:13].

Now we have time, and we’re going to take time, for just one other—then we have to stop—and I repeat, this is just a part, this is just a piece.  Oh, there is so much more, so much more!  And don’t you think things until you hear it all.

Now, when did that baptism take place?  And when does it take place?  According to the Word of God, in the days of John it was something beyond himself [Matthew 3:11].  According to the first chapter of the Book of Acts, when the Lord is raised from the dead and is meeting in His glorified body with His disciples, it is still something that is yet to come [Acts 1:4-5].  For the Lord said, “John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days hence” [Acts 1:5].  But it is immediately coming [Acts 1:5].  It is immediately coming.

Now, when I turn to the eleventh chapter of the Book of Acts and read from Simon Peter, why, I know that it has already come to pass; for Simon Peter says, about what happened at Caesarea, “Then remembered I the word of the Lord, how that He said, John indeed baptized with water, but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost” [Acts 1:5].  So I know that between the saying of the word of the Lord in the first chapter of Acts, and the eleventh chapter of Acts in the words of Simon Peter [Acts 11:16], between those two termini, this thing came to pass, the outpouring of the Spirit came to pass.

Then as I read, I know that it happened at Pentecost [Acts 2:1-4].  It happened at Pentecost and thereafter, this outpouring of the Holy Spirit of God.  It is a very definite thing in the mind of the Lord.  It is not something that came by human merit, or by praying, or by working, or by anything.  It was as definitely set in the time and program of the Lord God [Acts 1:4-5], as was the day of the birth of our Lord and the incarnation of our Lord [Matthew 1:20-25], and the death of our Lord, the crucifixion of our Lord [Matthew 27:32-50], and the resurrection of our Lord [Matthew 28:1-7], and the ascension of the Lord, and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit of God [Acts 2:1-4].  All of those things were not wrought, they did not come to pass because of our praying, or our working, or our merit.  It is a gift of God.  It is something that God does [Ephesians 2:8-9].

Now you look.  The Lord said to His disciples, after He was raised from the dead, “Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you: but tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be clothed with power from on high” [Luke 24:49]Kathizete, kathizete, now there is a command, and there is an imperative, kathizete, from kathizō: “sit down.”  Sit down, sit down, imperative, mandated; sit down.  Here it is translated “tarry” [Luke 24:49].  You could say “remain,” you could say “wait,” you could translate it any way.  What the word actually is, is sit down.  “Sit down in the city of Jerusalem until ye be endued with power from on high” [Luke 24:49].  Now they waited, they sat down in Jerusalem, and while they were waiting there they had a prayer meeting [Acts 1:12-14].  But the prayer meeting had nothing to do with the outpouring of the Spirit.  While they were seated down and waiting in Jerusalem, they had fellowship with one another; but that had nothing to do with the coming of the Holy Spirit.  And they also elected an apostle [Acts 1:21-26]; that had nothing to do with the Holy Spirit.  And also they talked about Judas and read the Word of God and saw that in the prophecy [Acts 1:16-20].  That had nothing to do with the Holy Spirit.  The coming of the Holy Spirit was a set day in the mind of God from the beginning of the creation.

Now, it was at that set time and it was in that set place.  “There, sit down in Jerusalem” [Luke 24:49].  Had they been in any other place in the world, He would not have come upon them.  For example, the prophecy in Joel said, “And it shall come to pass that I will pour out My Spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your old men shall dream dreams” [Joel 2:28].  Then the prophecy says, “And it shall come to pass, that whosoever calls on the name of the Lord…for in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem shall be deliverance, as the Lord hath said” [Joel 2:32].  And had they been waiting in Galilee, they would not have received the blessing.  And had they been waiting in Samaria, or in any other place in the world, for the Lord God said, “In Jerusalem, sit down, and wait,” and they sat down and waited and tarried in Jerusalem [Luke 24:49].

Then it came according to the types of the Old Testament.  In the twenty-third chapter of the Book of Leviticus [Leviticus 23:15-16]––and I haven’t time to follow it through, we’ll just let it go, let it go––according to the types of the Old Testament, at Pentecost, pentekostas, “fiftieth,” the fiftieth day after Passover.  The Lord forty days tarrying in His resurrection glory [Acts 1:3], and then ten days after He had been glorified in heaven and received in heaven [Acts 1:9], on pentekostas, on “fiftieth,” the fiftieth day after He was crucified, the Holy Spirit was poured out into the earth [Acts 2:1-4].

All right, two or three things briefly said, and we could spend sermons on these things.  First, there is one Pentecost.  There is one Pentecost [Acts 2:1-47].  In the sense that I have been describing, there is one Pentecost.  And from then on all of the days that follow after, and all of the years in this dispensation of grace and the age of the church, He is with us.  “I will pray the Father,” said our Lord, “He shall give you that Holy Spirit, paraklētos, that He may abide with you forever” [John 14:16].  There will never be a second incarnation, never!

There will never be another Pentecost like this, never!  In the incarnation, God was made flesh [Matthew 1:23-25; John 1:14].  There’ll never be another one.  And in the ascension gift, it was poured out upon us at Pentecost [Acts 2:1-4], the gift of Jesus as He was glorified in heaven.  There is one Pentecost, and thereafter we have the Holy Spirit forever [John 14:16].

All right, in the next verse, “And He is here now, even the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot see; but ye know Him, for He dwelleth in you, and shall be in you” [John 14:17].  We are to have Pentecost every day of our lives.  We are to have Pentecost every moment of our lives.  We are to have Pentecost forever.  The power of the Holy Spirit upon us, the work of the Holy Spirit in us, in the church, in our souls, and our hearts, and our lives, and our efforts, and our testimony; we have Pentecost forever! forever, and ever, and ever, “That He may abide with you forever, that He may dwell in you and be with you forever and forever” [John 14:16]; today and this very moment!

All right, what’s the matter with us?  What’s the matter with us?  Our weakness and our ineffectiveness; what’s the matter with us?  “Oh,” you say, “He hasn’t come upon us.  Oh,” you say, “we got to search the skies.  Oh,” you say, “We got to plead with God,” as though God were reluctant!  As though the Holy Spirit kept back His blessing from His people!  As though God wanted to see the world damned and lost!  As though heaven were not interested, and we must plead with God and search the skies, and search the will of the heavens, and on and on and on!  Not now.  Not now.  The trouble lies down here, down here.

The Holy Spirit doesn’t have us, and we’re reluctant to let Him have us.  “Behold,” said the prophet Isaiah, “the hand of the Lord is not shortened, that it cannot save; neither His ear heavy, that He cannot hear: but your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid His face from you, that He will not hear” [Isaiah 59:1-2].  The reason we have to agonize, and pray, and fall on our faces, and beg, and cry is not because the Holy Spirit is not come, not because the power of God is not willing; the problem lies in our souls and in our hearts.  We are clogged up like a well filled with debris.  We’ve lost our communion with the Lord.  Our sins and iniquities have hid His face from us, and God cannot hear [Isaiah 59:1-2].

That’s why we have to agonize, and that’s why we have to pray and plead and wrestle like Jacob at Peniel.  All night long, and finally his will was not broken, and his life was not given to God until the Lord touched him, and he could not walk.  And in his pitifulness, he said, “O God, do not leave me like this.  Do not leave me without a blessing.”  And God blessed Jacob and changed his name from Jacob, “Supplanter, Deceiver,” to Israel, “a prince of God.”  But thereafter he halted when he walked [Genesis 32:24-31].  God had touched him.  But it wasn’t until God broke him, God broke him, that he had power to prevail.  And that’s with us.  Not up there, down here.

We’ve gone far beyond the time.  We’ll pick it up there next Sunday, and look to heaven for a blessing as He teaches us the truth of His Word.  Now Lee Roy, let’s sing us a song.  On the first note of the first stanza, somebody you—give your heart to Jesus, put your life in the church, to pray, to dedicate, to give yourself to the Lord—as we sing this song, on the first note, come.  When you stand up, stand up coming, while we all stand and sing our appeal.

THE BAPTISM BY THE HOLY SPIRIT

Dr. W. A. Criswell

1 Corinthians 12:13

1-30-66

I.          Introduction

A.  Study has changed my incorrect ideas

B.  Twisting of interpretation toward pre-conceived end

      1.  “From Jordan to Pentecost” booklet (1 Corinthians 12:13)

      2.  Preposition “in” vs. “by” (Matthew 23:16-22, Revelation 13:10)

  II.         What does God say?

A.  Baptizing with the Holy Ghost (Matthew 3:11, Acts 1:5)

B. Meaning of the doctrine of the baptism by the Holy Spirit reserved for the Epistles (Romans 6:3-5, 1 Corinthians 12:13, Galatians 3:27, Ephesians 4:5, 5:18, Colossians 2:12)

C.  One body created by the baptizing work of Holy Spirit (Ephesians 3:3-5)

D.  Christ the baptizer (Acts 1:4-5, Matthew 3:11)

  III.        The difference between baptizing and filling

A.  What is the disciples’ experience at Pentecost?

1.  The word is “filled” (Acts 2:1-4, 4:8, 31, 7:55, 8:17, 9:17, 10:44, 13:3, 9, 19:6)

B.  Never a command to be baptized by the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 5:18)

C.  Baptizing work of Holy Spirit is once-for-all; filling is again and again (1 Corinthians 12:13, Ephesians 5:18, 4:5, John 3:15-16, Titus 3:5)

D.  Baptism by the Holy Spirit is positional; filling is experiential

E.  Baptism places us in position to receive power (1 Corinthians 12:13)

1. The filling is the power for service, victory, conquest (Matthew 26:69-75, Acts 2:23, 6:3, 5, 7:55, 11:24, 13:9)

F.  Result of Spirit baptism is our placing in body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:13, Acts 2:47, 5:14)

      1. Many different results of the filling (Acts 2:4, 8, 11, 14, 42, 44-46)